UAE orders additional Seeker UAV from Denel

The United Arab Emirates has ordered an additional Seeker 400 unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) from Denel Dynamics, worth more than R109 million.

The contract was announced by the Spokesman for the UMEX and SimTEX 2020 exhibitions, Staff Brigadier Fahd Nasser Al Thehli during the Unmanned Systems Exhibition (UMEX) held in Abu Dhabi on February this year.

During the UMEX, Denel showcased a variant of its Seeker 400 UAV, which has an enlarged nose for a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and hump above the wing for beyond line of sight satellite communications link. It was also fitted with two surface-to-air missiles.

The Seeker 400 is usually outfitted with a gimballed dual imaging electro-optical/infrared payloads. According to Denel, a combination of these sensors are usually fitted: Colour daylight camera with zoom lens; infrared thermal imager with step fields of view; day colour or monochrome spotter camera; night spotter camera, laser designator and laser range finder.

The Seeker 400 System operates at direct line-of-sight (LOS) ranges of up to 250 km from the base station, with up to 16 hours endurance, service ceiling of up to 18 000 ft and payload capacity of up to 100 kg.

“An electronic intelligence (ELINT) payload is available for detection and location of radar emitters. To provide for multi-mission and multi-roles, optional sensors and specific payloads like synthetic aperture radar (SAR), communications intelligence (COMINT), signals intelligence (SIGINT) and satellite communications can be integrated.”

DefenceWeb

For a while now, the UAE have been procuring Seeker UAVs from Denel including, Seeker II, Seeker 200 and Seeker 400 UAVs from Denel. The UAE is the launch customer for both the Seeker 200 and 400.

Pertaining to the UAE Seeker 400 contract, Denel will supply the Arab nation with six UAV units, two ground control stations, six electro-optics payloads, synthetic aperture radar (SAR), satellite communication (SATCOM), and the integration of weapons.

Patrick Kenyette

Freelance journalist and Photographer, and regular African Military Blog contributor